Archive for the ‘Endangered Species Act’ Tag

Ocean Rehab is now on Facebook Causes   Leave a comment

Facebook Causes Link

Facebook Causes Link for Ocean Rehab

Ocean Rehab is now on Facebook Causes

Please join our Causes Group as a member on Facebook Causes

ASE: Foreverglades Day 2011, join Ocean Rehab   Leave a comment

Audubon Society of the Everglades: “Foreverglades” Day 2011 on February 12, 2011 at Arthur Marshall Wildlife.

— join Ocean Rehab Initiative Inc. for this amazing Event. http://www.auduboneverglades.org/?p=1800

Everglades Day 2010 (Click to Enlarge)

This is one of our favorite events to Expo for Florida.

Some of the waters that affect our precious Florida Coral Reefs travel threw the Everglades and discharge into Florida Bay. The consequence can be catastrophic for marine life if not properly managed. (Enough with the bad news!!.. Everyone here wants to protect Florida and loves the Florida Lifestyle.)

ASE Everglades Day is more of a celebration of activism and conservation and it’s your opportunity to Celebrate with Us. So join us won’t you?

2011 Jim Abernethy’s victory at Sea.   Leave a comment

Jim Abernethy’s victory at Sea.

 We realize that Jim is not the only person sharing this Victory, all of us at Ocean Rehab Initiative and all of you who care about SHARKS are celebrating as well..!

Some great Jim Abernethy Shark pics are here

 By Matthew O. Berger IPS

WASHINGTON, Dec 22, 2010 (IPS) – The U.S. Congress banned shark finning in all U.S. waters Tuesday, a victory environmental advocates are hoping sends a message to international regulators.

The law will require all sharks caught in U.S. waters to be landed with their fins still naturally attached, outlawing the practice in which fishers cut off sharks’ fins – the most lucrative part of the animal – and dump the mutilated shark back into the water to sink and eventually die.

Demand for shark fins has been growing in recent decades due to the expansion of the middle-class in China, where the fins are used in soup.

Previously, the U.S. had finning restrictions in force for its Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico waters. This legislation extends that ban to the Pacific.

The bill had been approved by the U.S. House of Representatives in April 2009 but the Senate’s approval did not come until Monday. Tuesday, the House approved the Senate’s version.

The law does not ban the sale of shark fins in the U.S., but, according to Matt Rand, director of the Pew Environment Group’s global shark conservation work, it “leaves the door open” for trade restrictions by the U.S. at some future point on countries that do not have comparable regulations on shark finning.

Between when the bill was first introduced in April 2008 and now, 145 million sharks have been killed, according to Pew Environment. Coupled with the fact that sharks are slow- growing and produce relatively few young since they mature later in life, this rate of harvest can be particularly harmful to shark populations.

Shark finning at sea allows fishing vessels to harvest many more fins at one time than they would be able to if they kept the rest of the shark carcass – and its usually much less valuable flesh – onboard. But the new U.S. law will prohibit U.S. vessels from having any shark fins on board that are not connected to the carcass, thus hopefully slowing the demise of shark populations and preventing what is seen as a cruel and wasteful practice.

Internationally, activists hope this law will propel the U.S. into a leadership position on shark conservation at international negotiations.

Rand said this policy gives the U.S. a mandate to push for similarly strong bans globally. “This is not only a federal policy but also mandates that the U.S. carries this torch to international negotiations and to other countries,” he said.
The new law caps a busy year for international shark conservation activists.  Studies have shown sharks to be worth up to hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in tourism, as opposed to tens of dollars when caught.

“We’ve finally realized that sharks are worth more alive than dead,” said Elizabeth Griffin Wilson, a marine scientist and fisheries campaign manager at the conservation group Oceana, in response to Tuesday’s U.S. legislation. “While shark fins and other shark products are valuable, the role sharks play in the marine ecosystem is priceless.”

Responder Award for Gulf Oil Event, July 2010   Leave a comment

Ocean Rehab’s #1 Responder Award for the Gulf Oil Event:

Dawn Saves Wildlife Poster

"Dawn Saves Wildlife" Poster and Image

 -Our choice for the Award is DAWN ; of “Dawn Saves Wildlife”, I can not image these days without Dawn. Thanks Dawn. http://www.facebook.com/dawnsaveswildlife

Awesome work and passion, Wow.

Florida Dive Industry reaction to Oil Spill; Video   2 comments

Help us to save this valuable resource.

“The video was not made for you; it was created for species that can not speak for themselves”. 

quote from Crew member of Catch Clean Cook TV,  Ocean Rehab volunteer, videographer and activist- Mr. David Desrochers II.

David-  you spoke a trillion words.

Florida Oil Spill Habitat survey video of Reef   Leave a comment

Florida Oil Spill Habitat survey video of Reef by Ocean Rehab Initiative Inc.

Oil Spill underwater survey video in Florida June 2010, precautionary measures being taken to protect Florida’s treasures.

Ocean Rehab uses these contacts for reporting Oil Damages   Leave a comment

Ocean Rehab uses these contacts for reporting Oil Damages:
-from Fish and Wildlife Research Institute- (FWC) they contact the Coast Guard to investigate our findings.  E-mail photo’s to SWP@EM.MyFlorida.com for Florida Oil Spill damages.

Baby Mangrove seedling on transect

Baby Mangrove seedling on transect

  • Florida Oil Spill Information Line (replaces Fla. Emergency Info. Line): 888-337-3569.
  • To report oiled wildlife: 866-557-1401.
  • To discuss spill-related damage: 800-440-0858.
  • To report oiled shoreline: 866-448-5816.
  • To request volunteer information: 866-448-5816
    William Djubin President Ocean Rehab Initiative Inc.